Early Childhood Education Training 

Pennsylvania Knowledge Area 8: Program Organization and Administration

Trainings are customized to meet the needs of the audience.

This is not a comprehensive list. Interested in a topic not listed?

Contact the instructor, Tonia Breech, to create a session to address your center's specific professional development needs! 

Pennsylvania Knowledge Area 3: Family, School, and Community Partnerships

Pennsylvania Knowledge Area 6:Professionalism and Leadership

Pennsylvania Knowledge Area 5:Communication

Family Conferencing: Asking and Listening

K3.2 C2

Families are our children’s first teachers. Facilitating effective conferences extends the learning in the classroom to the child’s home. This course will cover the following learning objectives:

  • identify effective conferencing techniques.

  • evaluate their current level of knowledge and information about the children in their classrooms

  •  improve their ability to ask for information

  • enhance their skills for listening to family members

  • contribute ideas to pre-conference family questionnaires

  • learn how to create action plans in collaboration with parents during conferences

  • complete conference-planning forms as a part of conference planning process.

Engaging Families in Early Childhood Organizations

D3.3 C2

High-quality early childhood programs are highly effective in engaging and supporting the families they serve. Engaging Families addresses the full spectrum of responsibilities in working with families: welcoming, supporting, engaging, and communicating with parents. In addition, it provides helpful advice on working with all types of families in today's society.

Family Conferencing: Asking and Listening

K3.2 C2

Families are our children’s first teachers. Facilitating effective conferences extends the learning in the classroom to the child’s home. This course will cover the following learning objectives:

  • identify effective conferencing techniques.

  • evaluate their current level of knowledge and information about the children in their classrooms

  •  improve their ability to ask for information

  • enhance their skills for listening to family members

  • contribute ideas to pre-conference family questionnaires

  • learn how to create action plans in collaboration with parents during conferences

  • complete conference-planning forms as a part of conference planning process.

Family Conferencing: Asking and Listening

K3.2 C2

Families are our children’s first teachers. Facilitating effective conferences extends the learning in the classroom to the child’s home. This course will cover the following learning objectives:

  • identify effective conferencing techniques.

  • evaluate their current level of knowledge and information about the children in their classrooms

  •  improve their ability to ask for information

  • enhance their skills for listening to family members

  • contribute ideas to pre-conference family questionnaires

  • learn how to create action plans in collaboration with parents during conferences

  • complete conference-planning forms as a part of conference planning process.

Community Action Poverty Simulation (CAPS)

K3.3 C3, K3.4 C3, K3.5 C3

The Community Action Poverty Simulation breaks down stereotypes by allowing participants to step into the real-life situations of others. 

The simulation involves participants who take on the roles of members of up to 26 families, all facing a variety of challenging, but typical, circumstances.  To start the simulation exercise, each family is given a card explaining its unique circumstances.  It is then the families’ task to provide food, shelter, and other necessities by accessing various community resources during four 15-minute “weeks.” In addition, about 20 volunteers - preferably people who have experienced poverty - play the roles of resource providers in the community.  This allows individuals who have firsthand knowledge of poverty bring their perceptions to the exercise.

The Community Action Poverty Simulation is conducted in a large room.  Participants are seated in family groups and community resources are located at tables around the perimeter of the room.  The facilitator opens the simulation with an orientation to the activity, goes over ground rules, and answers participant questions during the exercise. The activity lasts about three hours.  This time frame includes an introduction and briefing by the facilitator, the simulation exercise, and a guided debriefing in which participants and volunteers share their observations and insights from the activity.

Poverty is often portrayed as a stand-alone issue - but this simulation allows individuals to walk a month in the shoes of someone who is facing poverty and realize how complex and interconnected issues of poverty really are.

Community Action Poverty Simulation (CAPS)

K3.3 C3, K3.4 C3, K3.5 C3

The Community Action Poverty Simulation breaks down stereotypes by allowing participants to step into the real-life situations of others. 

The simulation involves participants who take on the roles of members of up to 26 families, all facing a variety of challenging, but typical, circumstances.  To start the simulation exercise, each family is given a card explaining its unique circumstances.  It is then the families’ task to provide food, shelter, and other necessities by accessing various community resources during four 15-minute “weeks.” In addition, about 20 volunteers - preferably people who have experienced poverty - play the roles of resource providers in the community.  This allows individuals who have firsthand knowledge of poverty bring their perceptions to the exercise.

The Community Action Poverty Simulation is conducted in a large room.  Participants are seated in family groups and community resources are located at tables around the perimeter of the room.  The facilitator opens the simulation with an orientation to the activity, goes over ground rules, and answers participant questions during the exercise. The activity lasts about three hours.  This time frame includes an introduction and briefing by the facilitator, the simulation exercise, and a guided debriefing in which participants and volunteers share their observations and insights from the activity.

Poverty is often portrayed as a stand-alone issue - but this simulation allows individuals to walk a month in the shoes of someone who is facing poverty and realize how complex and interconnected issues of poverty really are.

Community Action Poverty Simulation (CAPS)

K3.3 C3, K3.4 C3, K3.5 C3

The Community Action Poverty Simulation breaks down stereotypes by allowing participants to step into the real-life situations of others. 

The simulation involves participants who take on the roles of members of up to 26 families, all facing a variety of challenging, but typical, circumstances.  To start the simulation exercise, each family is given a card explaining its unique circumstances.  It is then the families’ task to provide food, shelter, and other necessities by accessing various community resources during four 15-minute “weeks.” In addition, about 20 volunteers - preferably people who have experienced poverty - play the roles of resource providers in the community.  This allows individuals who have firsthand knowledge of poverty bring their perceptions to the exercise.

The Community Action Poverty Simulation is conducted in a large room.  Participants are seated in family groups and community resources are located at tables around the perimeter of the room.  The facilitator opens the simulation with an orientation to the activity, goes over ground rules, and answers participant questions during the exercise. The activity lasts about three hours.  This time frame includes an introduction and briefing by the facilitator, the simulation exercise, and a guided debriefing in which participants and volunteers share their observations and insights from the activity.

Poverty is often portrayed as a stand-alone issue - but this simulation allows individuals to walk a month in the shoes of someone who is facing poverty and realize how complex and interconnected issues of poverty really are.

Engaging Families in Early Childhood Organizations

D3.3 C2

High-quality early childhood programs are highly effective in engaging and supporting the families they serve. Engaging Families addresses the full spectrum of responsibilities in working with families: welcoming, supporting, engaging, and communicating with parents. In addition, it provides helpful advice on working with all types of families in today's society.

Family (or Parent) Conferencing: Developing Trust

K5.3 C2

When childcare advocates ask parents what they are looking for in quality care the word “trust” always is mentioned. Families must feel trust for their child’s caregiver. Trust can be developed in many ways. This course will cover the following learning objectives:

  • learn effective conferencing techniques

  • develop a deeper understanding of the needs of family members

  • assess the importance of developing trust and the relationship of trust to conferencing

  • identify ways to foster mutual trust

Family (or Parent) Conferencing: Developing Trust

K5.3 C2

When childcare advocates ask parents what they are looking for in quality care the word “trust” always is mentioned. Families must feel trust for their child’s caregiver. Trust can be developed in many ways. This course will cover the following learning objectives:

  • learn effective conferencing techniques

  • develop a deeper understanding of the needs of family members

  • assess the importance of developing trust and the relationship of trust to conferencing

  • identify ways to foster mutual trust

From the Inside Out: The Power of Reflection and Self-Awareness

D5.1 C3

The quest for excellence begins with an inner quest to discover who we are-our passions, values, talents, personal resources, and even those foibles and annoying habits we might prefer not to acknowledge. Having a better relationship of ourselves is the first step toward achieving a better relationship with others. This workshop is an invitation to self-discovery. Through thought-provoking questions and engaging exercises, you’ll have an opportunity to reflect on where you are in your journey through adulthood, determine the gap between your current and ideal work environment, and become a self-mentor for envisioning new possibility for the decades ahead.

Circle of Influence: Implementing Shared Decision Making and Participative Management

D6.2 C3

Building trust and a spirit of collaboration among staff in childcare centers is central to achieving high-performing work teams. Meaningful staff involvement in decision making is one way that trust and commitment to organizational goals is achieved. This workshop provides a framework for analyzing different types of decisions in child care center management and suggest ways that Directors can move toward a more participative process in achieving program goals.

Promoting Early Childhood Services

K6.10 C2, K6.11 C2

Professionals working in early childhood organizations need to continually improve their skills and broaden their perspectives. Promoting Early Childhood Services offers practical advice from leading experts in our field on economics, advocating for children and families and promoting your program.

Promoting Early Childhood Services

K6.10 C2, K6.11 C2

Professionals working in early childhood organizations need to continually improve their skills and broaden their perspectives. Promoting Early Childhood Services offers practical advice from leading experts in our field on economics, advocating for children and families and promoting your program.

Cultivating Curriculum in Early Childhood Organizations

D6.6 C3

A high-quality curriculum is at the core of a high quality early childhood program. Cultivating an Early Childhood Curriculum provides practical, down-to-earth advice from leading experts on curriculum development. Content focuses on child development, curriculum principles, environmental design, and program evaluation.

Inspiring Peak Performance: Competence, Commitment, and Collaboration

D6.2 C3

Imagine what your program would look like if it were a true professional learning community—a place where teachers see each new day as an opportunity to expand their competence and confidence and support one another in moving toward a shared vision of program excellence. This workshop presents five strategies—developmental supervision, teacher induction, individual learning plans, peer learning teams, and 360-degree feedback—that together will help you build teacher competence, strengthen staff commitment, and expand opportunities for collaboration to make that vision come alive.

A Great Place to Work: Creating a Healthy Organizational Climate

D6.11 C3

Early childhood program administrators often have a global impression that things are going well or not so well at their center, but they lack specific information on just which areas of the program contribute to those impressions. This session looks closely at how ten dimensions of organizational climate help shape the quality of work life for staff. Through thought-provoking questions and engaging exercises, you'll learn how to assess the organizational climate of your program, consider the unique role perspective plays in shaping work attitudes and behavior, and implement specific strategies that will help you create a great place to work.

 Leading Early Childhood Organizations

D6.9 C1

Leadership matters in early childhood. Leading Early Childhood Organizations provides you with practical advice from top experts on leadership in the early childhood arena. Content focuses on the skills required to lead an organization, supervise staff, and manage the organization.

 Leading Early Childhood Organizations

D6.9 C1

Leadership matters in early childhood. Leading Early Childhood Organizations provides you with practical advice from top experts on leadership in the early childhood arena. Content focuses on the skills required to lead an organization, supervise staff, and manage the organization.

Developing People in Early Childhood Organizations

D6.4 C3

Professionals working in early childhood organizations need to continually improve their skills and broaden their perspectives. Developing People offers practical advice from leading experts in our field on selecting, training, and appraising staff, as well as promoting teamwork among staff members.

How Do I Relate and Share Professionally?

K6.10 C1, K6.3 C1

Bringing your professional self to the classroom every day requires conscious effort. In every interaction with a child, parent, and peer you have the opportunity to strengthen a relationship with your words and actions.  This course will cover the following learning objectives:

  • understand how to relate to other staff professionally

  • establish and maintain relationships by improving communication and listening

  • share professionally by advocating for policies within the political web

The Right Fight: Recruiting, Selecting, and Orienting Staff

D8.11 C2

Successful staff recruitment and selection is a crucial component of administering high quality ECE programs. Having the right teacher in the right position requires that Directors have a repertoire of effective recruitment, screening, selection, and orientation strategies at their fingertips. This workshop provides a framework for learning about strategies for improving the likelihood that ECE Directors will be successful in finding the right person for the job opportunities they offer.

Making the Most of Meetings

D8.14 C2

Meetings are the glue that holds early childhood organizations together. Whether they are weekly staff meetings, monthly parent meetings, or annual board meetings, Directors rely on meetings at the primary vehicle for communicating information, promoting professional growth, solving problems, and building a sense of community. This workshop provides a framework for planning and conducting more engaging and productive staff meetings. Participants will learn how to increase a group’s commitment to shared goals, arrive at decisions supported by everyone, and have more fun in the process!

Leadership in Action: How Effective Directors Get Things Done

D8.14 C3

True leaders come in all shapes and sizes. Some are outgoing and charismatic; others are quietly influential. This workshop explores the concept of leadership in the context of early childhood education. It looks at the multifaceted role of the Director and the skills and competencies needed to nurture leadership at all levels of an organization. From practical suggestions and lively examples from high-performing Directors, participants will learn how to create and sustain a compelling vision that transforms their centers into vibrant and engaging learning communities.

Managing Money in Early Childhood Organizations

D8.5 C3

Administrators of early childhood programs must be as effective at managing financial matters as they are at caring for young children and their families. Managing Money in Early Childhood Organizations provides you with practical advice from top experts on every aspect of money management, including budgeting, fundraising, financial reporting, cash flow analysis, audits, salary schedules, fee policies, collection techniques, and more.